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Thursday, May 14, 2020 | History

1 edition of Moisture storage and crop yields in the dryfarming areas of the Great Plains found in the catalog.

Moisture storage and crop yields in the dryfarming areas of the Great Plains

as affected by natural and farm operational factors

by H. H. Finnell

  • 144 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soil moisture,
  • Crop yields

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby H.H. Finnell
    SeriesProduction research report -- no. 39
    The Physical Object
    Pagination31 p. :
    Number of Pages31
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26308159M
    OCLC/WorldCa16416208

      Apart from enhancing crop yields, the practice also has a great beneficial residual effect on soil nutrients. A proper and site-specific fertilizer application with tillage practices can increase water availability for crops by increasing soil water storage capacity, reducing soil evaporation and allowing a high and sustainable crop yield Cited by: 6. USDA-ARS, Central Great Plains Research Station, County Road GG, Akron, CO Abstract Forages, with greater water use efficiency (WUE) than grain and seed crops, could be used to diversify reduced and no-till dryland cropping systems from the traditional wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)–fallow system in the semiarid central Great Plains.

    air can remove moisture and dry grain at a rate of ½ to 1 percent per moisture reaches near storage goal level,drying using this method is very producers field­dry grain to a certain moisture content and then harvest and File Size: KB. PROBLEMS OF CROP PRODUCTION IN DRYLAND. Dry farming crops are characterized by very low and highly variable and uncertain yields. Crop failures are quite common. These are mainly due to the following causes. Inadequate and uneven distribution of rainfall. In general, the rainfall is low and highly variable which results in uncertain crop yields.

    High Moisture Corn Drying and Storage (PDF) Corn Webinar Seppdf — PDF document, MB ( bytes) Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. The root yields of prairie grasses contributed greatly to the high SOM levels of Great Plains soil and explain why land dominated by forest vegetation is relatively lower in SOM. Soils that form under prairie vegetation commonly have SOM levels at least twice as great as soils formed under forest vegetation.


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Moisture storage and crop yields in the dryfarming areas of the Great Plains by H. H. Finnell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Moisture Storage and Crop Yields in the Dryfarming Areas of the Great Plains, as Affected by Natural and Farm Operational Factors (Classic Reprint) [Finnell, Henry Howard] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Moisture Storage and Crop Yields in the Dryfarming Areas of the Great Plains, as Affected by Natural and Farm Operational Factors (Classic Reprint)Author: Henry Howard Finnell. Get this from a library. Moisture storage and crop yields in the dryfarming areas of the Great Plains: as affected by natural and farm operational factors.

[H H Finnell; United States. Agricultural Research Service.]. Dryland farming is practiced in the semiarid American Great Plains and Canadian Prairies whereby the soil is cultivated in ways that conserve precious moisture. For generations European Americans coming to the Great Plains of North America labored to squeeze the most out of a land often short on rainfall.

South Plains crops looking good despite low moisture. In the case of corn and soybeans, the U.S. crop is off to a great start, and early indications are for some record corn yields in parts of. Crop yields and soil organic matter responses to sheep grazing in US northern Great Plains Abstract Sheep (Ovis aries L.) grazing, a cost-effective method of controlling weeds compared to herbicide applicationand tillage, may influence soil C and N levels by consuming plant residue and returning feces and urine to the.

these additional reports on cover crop effects on subsequent crop yields. In the studies that have been done in the semi-arid environments of the central and southern Great Plains (Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas) most studies have shown that growing cover crops reduced subsequent crop yields.

Pre-storage Grain Drying. Pre-storage grain drying is a necessity for wet grains. For example, optimum moisture content for harvesting corn without mechanical damage is 22%. But optimum moisture content for stored corn is 14% or lower.

High-temperature dryers can speed up drying time for wet grain and are energy efficient. But the exchange is. yields of single-species plantings of oat and triticale were the same as mixtures of those species with pea, and that total dry Table 1.

Water use efficiency (kg ha–1 mm–1) of seed production for pea, chickpea, and lentil in the Central Great Plains (Nielsen, ) and Northern Great Plains (Miller et al., ).

Species. Start studying U.S. History Ch. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Why was wheat a suitable crop to grow on the Great Plains. Wheat was a suitable crop to grow on the Great Plains due to the fact that wheat could withstand drought better than corn and other crops.

What events brought the way of life of the Plains Indians to an end. "A fitting sequel to Hargreaves's first book on dry farming in the northern Great Plains. Again she has delved deeply into the relevant literature, exploring the effects of technological advance, policies, climatic factors, and economic variables as they have affected one of the nation's important and unique farming areas."--Howard W.

Ottoson Author: Don Paarlberg. Mr McKenzie said the Liverpool Plains planting window would stay open well into July, “Time is ticking, and a larger summer crop is a contingency plan some growers are thinking about.” Mr McKenzie said 50mm of rain would enable planting of wheat and barley in paddocks with considerable subsoil moisture at depth.

Hence, dryland farmers in the semi-arid central Great Plains should be cautious when considering the use of cover crops in their farming operations as there is a high likelihood that subsequent crop yields will be decreased due to the cover crop water use.

03 Development of corn crop water production functions across years and locations using a. Central Great Plains David C. Nielsen,* Merle F. Vigil, and Joseph G. Benjamin ABSTRACT Forages, with greater water use efficiency (WUE) than grain and seed crops, could be used to diversify reduced and no-till dryland cropping systems from the traditional wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)– fallow system in the semiarid central Great Plains.

SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION With a Focus on Water Harvesting crop yields can be improved significantly, and successful crop production can be made possible even in areas that are producing poorly under existing conditions.

In dry regions without moisture, and have successfully been used in dryland farming situation around the world. • Initial moisture content is normally limited to 22 to 24%.

• Drying results from forcing unheated air through grain at airflow rates of 1 to 2 cfm/bu. • Drying and storage occur in the. Sheep (Ovis aries L.) grazing, a cost-effective method of controlling weeds compared to herbicide application and tillage, may influence soil C and N levels by consuming plant residue and returning feces and urine to the soil, but little is known about the practice on soil C and N storage under dryland cropping systems in the northern Great Plains, by: 6.

As a short-season forage crop may have the potential to be grown for forage in dry-land cropping systems in the central Great Plains region of North America (Nielsen et al. Foxtail millet. As tillage systems progressed from clean-till to sweep-till to no-till, average precipitation storage efficiency during the fallow period in the central Great Plains increased by more than 75% (Nielsen and Vigil, ).

The yields of the following crop increased with the additional water available to the by: Improperly ensiling high-moisture corn will result in excessive spoilage and storage losses.

High-moisture corn tends to ferment faster in the rumen and requires better bunk management, compared with dry corn. Harvesting. High-moisture corn should be harvested at 24 to 33 percent moisture for optimum storage (maximum moisture of 40 percent).

The goal is to get corn to 15% moisture and 30°F for storage from December through February. If you can't get the corn to 15% moisture before discontinuing fan operation, it is critical that you get the temperature down to °F to arrest mold growth.The data for profile moisture storage in and cm depth of soil revealed that with delay in moisture conservation through tillage for creating soil mulch after harvest of maize crop, there was significant and continuous decline in moisture content (Tables 3 and 4).Sorghum production is concentrated in areas where corn production is limited because the rainfall is insufficient or unfavorably distributed and the temperatures are too high.

Thus most of the domestic sorghum acreage is in the southern Great Plains states, with Texas, Kansas and Nebraska the leading producers.